Today 5 events

'Judges in Conversation' series: the Hon. Justice Christopher Jessup with Professor Neil Duxbury

This event commences in about 6 hours from now

The Melbourne Law School and the Federal Court of Australia present the first Judges in Conversation series for 2015. The Hon. Justice Christopher Neil Jessup, a Judge of the Federal Court of Australia, will be in conversation with Professor Neil Duxbury, London School of Economics. Professor Neil Duxbury is Professor of Law at the London School of Economics. He is the author of Random Justice (OUP, 1999), Patterns of American Jurisprudence (OUP, 1995), Frederick Pollock and the English Jur...

Lupus and Snurps: from bedside to bench and back again

This event commences in about 7 hours from now

There has been in recent years a push from some leaders in the U.S. National Institutes of Health for supporting “Translational Research” – research aimed at solving a particular medical problem. This talk will discuss how research aimed at understanding basic questions in biology, such as how messenger RNA is translated into proteins by ribosomes, can provide information and ideas that may result in useful drugs – antibiotics. Lupus and Snurps: from bedside to bench and back again presented...

The First World War and China's Great Awakening

This event commences in about 7 hours from now

The Kathleen Fitzpatrick Annual History Lecture will explain China's important role in the Great War and how the Great War affected China's national development and its position in the world. It will highlight 140,000 Chinese workers' extraordinary journey to France and the Chinese heroic fight at the Postwar peace conference. Xu Guoqi is a professor in the Department of History at the University of Hong Kong and is the author of China and The Great War. From 201416, Professor Xu spends part...

Presenter(s)

Weird melancholy: The Australian gothic

The University’s collection of early landscape painting shows that our most celebrated artists were not free of anxieties about the natural environment and the ghosts that haunt it, indeed many could not escape them. Weird melancholy brings together works from the nineteenth century to the contemporary era. The exhibition reveals how artists are attempting to confront the ‘weirdness’ of their home and in doing so engaged tropes of the colonial gothic tradition. IMAGE: Arthur Boyd Australia S...

Brook Andrew. Sanctuary: Tombs of the outcasts

The world dramatically changed after the outbreak of WWI: Australia was not excluded. Described as the war to end all wars it would be a mere two decades before Europe was once again plagued by a major conflict. Australia has played its role in both of these wars and many other conflicts since. Wars leave a lasting impression on those who participate, on those left behind and on future generations who look to them for remembrance, lessons and identity. However, often parts of the narrative b...

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Wednesday, 29 Jul 2015

Biomedical Engineering Seminar: Network Inference using Data Based Modelling: Challenges and Pitfalls

Complex networks are powerful representations of spatially extended systems and can advance our understanding of their dynamics. A large number of analysis techniques is available that aim at inferring the underlying network structure from data. D...

Health financing policy and the burden of health expenditure on poor households in the aftermath of conflict

The financial costs of accessing services in low and middle income countries act as both a significant deterrent to use of care and as a factor in the impoverishment and maintenance in poverty of households. In the aftermath of conflict, as countr...

Hot, high and green? Research for developing Australian green roofs

Green roofs are increasingly being used internationally for their environmental, social and economic benefits. Much of the evidence of benefits is based on research from cooler, temperate climates, the evidence from drier, warmer, Mediterranean cl...

Farmers Market at the University of Melbourne

Enjoy a picnic lunch and shop direct from Victorian farmers for fresh, seasonal produce to take home. The new market is right in the heart of the Parkville campus with the support of The University and Carlton Connect Initiative and is positioned...

Merging convergence science & medicine education to develop future medicine

Convergence science is set to revolutionise health and medicine in the 21st century given the interplays occurring between physical science, computer science and life science think 3D printing, medical robotics, Big Data, nanotechnology and the m...

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Perspectives on Science and the Social Value of Research

Nobel laureate Professor Elizabeth Blackburn returns to Australia to deliver the 2015 Vincent Fairfax Ethics in Leadership Oration. Professor Blackburn will offer insights into the social value of research and discuss women in science, and will dr...

"The Artist as Collector": Sir Joshua Reynolds and his Collection of Art

Dr Donato Esposito will present a lecture on Sir Joshua Reynolds (17231792), the first and most famous President of the Royal Academy of Arts, London, focussing upon his activities as a collector of art.

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Politics and the Idea of Evil

The Wednesday Lectures Hosted by Raimond Gaita When politicians use the word ‘evil’ rather than one of the many expressions with which we record our sense that something is morally terrible, people often become uneasy and sometimes hostile. They ...

Kalari: India's Ancient Martial Art

As part of our Health, Culture & Spirituality series, we are pleased to present a seminar on the ancient martial art of India, Kalari. Dr Ranjit Rao, convenor of the series will present our local Kalari experts as they discuss the intricacies and...

Thursday, 30 Jul 2015

The new urban jungle - can green infrastructure really help make cities a better place to live?

Imagine a city where every hard built surface is blanketed in plants. This is the new urban jungle and green infrastructure has captured the hearts and minds of architects, artists, planners and people wanting to make cities more liveable. Put s...

Presenter(s)

Friday, 31 Jul 2015

Light and Matter: Bending Light Waves for New Technology

The July Lectures in Physics “International Year of Light 2015” Strange things happen when light interacts with nanoscale metallic objects. The wavelike nature of light can be manipulated to make objects invisible or to permit imaging with unprec...

Presenter(s)

Saturday, 1 Aug 2015

Kuala Lumpur Information Day

Interested in Veterinary Medicine, Agriculture or Food Science? High achieving students from Malaysia who wish to study at a highly ranked international university are invited to attend the University of Melbourne Information Day. Meet our friend...

Tuesday, 4 Aug 2015

Positive Computing: Technologies for psychological wellbeing and human potential

Digital technologies have made their way into all the aspects of our lives that, according to psychology, influence our wellbeing everything from social relationships and curiosity to engagement and learning. By bringing together research and me...

Presenter(s)

Linear Inequalities

Given several linear inequalities, it is not easy to see if they have a common solution in integers. It is even harder to actually find such solutions. Professor Vergne will give several examples where the existence of integral solutions is guaran...

Empathy and Perspective: A Smithian Conception of Humanity

This talk explores Adam Smith's conception of empathy (roughly, what he called "sympathy"), and its connection, for him, with our understanding of our selves. This lecture will begin with a comparison between Smith and David Hume on sympathy, move...

Booked out

New collectivities: Housing and the city

In our increasingly privatized world, coinhabited spaces are rather seen as sources of conflict rather than stimulators of interconnectivity, especially in dense urban contexts. Can we create new ways of connecting people, whether permanent or t...

Wednesday, 5 Aug 2015

Brave daughters of the Empire: British and Australian girls' fiction, 1900-1930

Historically, most British girls’ fiction was about home and family. In the early twentieth century, however, writers for girls began to mimic popular boys’ genres, including adventure stories and Robinsonades. The far reaches of the British Empir...

Presenter(s)

Preventing suicide:  a clinical and population-health perspective from the UK

Abstract: Suicide is a complex problem with many potential causes. Of course, we need to consider population wide and societal approaches but what role might health services have in preventing suicide?  Nav will draw on research from his unit in ...

Presenter(s)

Consumers enhancing WEHI Research

The Walter and Eliza Hall Institute is at the forefront of consumer involvement and support for medical research. Consumers support researchers with their grant proposals, influence research design and translation and can provide a powerful voi...

Collaborative Research at the Interface of Disciplines in Bio21: The Past 10 Years

Professor Emeritus Andrew Holmes shares some personal experiences as a foundation member of the Bio21 Institute. He will trace progress in collaborations with scientists in Australia and abroad in the areas of organic electronic materials, leading...

Responses to the Australian Human Rights Commission report: "The Forgotten Children" - Where to next on asylum seeker issues?

Join a panel conversation with: Michael Gordon, Political Editor, The Age Professor the Hon. Barry Jones AC, Melbourne Graduate School of Education, University of Melbourne Professor Cheryl Saunders AO, Laureate Professor, Personal Chair in Law, ...

Thursday, 6 Aug 2015

Panel Presentation: headspace – implementing and evaluating early intervention in youth mental health

headspace the National Youth Mental Health Foundation is now the largest provider of youth mental health care across Australia. First initiated in 2006 as the Australian Government’s response to a high level of need, but a low level of access, to ...

Tiffin Talk: US - Pakistan Relations Under Obama

Historically, USPakistan relations have largely followed a clientelistic pattern. The American patron needed a regional broker to contain communism, to play the middleman visàvis China and to offer support in the post9/11 “global war on terror”. T...

Tiffin Talk: US - Pakistan Relations Under Obama

Historically, USPakistan relations have largely followed a clientelistic pattern. The American patron needed a regional broker to contain communism, to play the middleman visàvis China and to offer support in the post9/11 “global war on terror”. T...

Proportionality and its use in Australian Constitutional Law

The Sir Anthony Mason Honorary lecture was inaugurated in 1995, the year of Sir Anthony Mason's retirement as Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia. The lecture serves to celebrate Sir Anthony Mason's outstanding contribution to the legal p...

Presenter(s)

Indigenous language and communication matters in the law

This talk will use a case study (Western Australia v Gibson WASC 2014) to show why and how Indigenous language and communication matters in the law. This case highlights what it means for people who speak a traditional Indigenous language as their...

Presenter(s)

Wildlife Health in the 21st Century

How many people can the earth support, and with what quality of life? In the 21st century, this question has moved from a matter of passive speculation to an active global experiment in which all of humanity is participating as subject, scientist,...

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Monday, 3 Aug 2015

IWSP7: Epilepsy Mechanisms, Models, Prediction & Control

This interdisciplinary and international conference will bring together world leading epileptologists, engineers, computer scientists, physicists, mathematicians, neurosurgeons and neuroscientists to focus on epilepsy research.

Monday, 10 Aug 2015

The emergence of transcription factors as therapeutic tools for cancer therapy: a personal story

The ribosomal RNA gene (rDNA) loci comprise large arrays of tandem repeats (~200) that encode the central RNA component of ribosomes, rRNA. A dedicated polymerase, Pol I, transcribes the rDNA in the nucleolus, the site of ribosome biogenesis. Wor...

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For Good and Bad: Stem Cells and Organoids in Health and Disease

A chance for all medical researchers to hear Professor Hans Clevers explain how adult stem cells help repair damage to diseased organs, fight the aging process and are the basis for cancer. Hans Clevers' research has shaped our understanding of W...

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Tuesday, 11 Aug 2015

Teacher evaluation and standardised tests: A policy fiasco

Dean's Lecture Series 2015 In the United States almost all recent designs of teacher evaluation systems rely on standardised tests of student achievement as a substantial part of, or all of the teacher evaluation process. These tests have one cha...

Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Death Penalty

Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Death Penalty Should democratic countries apply the death penalty? Does Islam require the death penalty? Are executions a breach of human rights? Is religion an obstacle to the human rights reform? Profes...

Contesting Academic Freedom: Descartes, Spinoza, and the Limits of Toleration

The principle of libertas philosophandi (or freedom of philosophising) was widely debated in seventeenth century Europe. Should philosophers and other academics be allowed to write and teach without any boundaries given by religion and politics or...

Presenter(s)

Tuesday, 28 Jul 2015

Brook Andrew. Sanctuary: Tombs of the outcasts

The world dramatically changed after the outbreak of WWI: Australia was not excluded. Described as the war to end all wars it would be a mere two decades before Europe was once again plagued by a major conflict. Australia has played its role in bo...

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