Biomedical Engineering Seminar: Realistic spiking models of octopus cell circuits of the mammalian auditory brainstem

Seminar/Forum

Biomedical Engineering Seminar: Realistic spiking models of octopus cell circuits of the  mammalian auditory brainstem

Brown Theatre
Building 193, Electrical & Electronic Engineering Building

Booking not required

Further Details

T: (03) 9035 3796

grayden@unimelb.edu.au

Octopus cells are named after their unique shape, with dendrites oriented in one direction. They receive input from a large number of Auditory Nerve Fibers (>60) representing a broad frequency band. The talk covers three topics relating to the computational modelling of the behaviour and function of octopus cells:

  1. A multi-compartmental Hodgkin-Huxley model, combined with a realistic model of the auditory periphery was used to determine the importance of the octopus cells' dendritic delay. We found that this dendritic delay might compensate for systematic asynchrony across ANFs with different CFs.
  2. A modified leaky integrate-and-fire model with a simple dendritic delay to investigate the function of octopus cells output in the ventral nucleus of the lateral lemniscus. In particular, we used realistic sounds to investigate the effect when octopus cell output is converted to inhibition, as observed experimentally.
  3. The same model was used to determine whether spike timing dependent plasticity might be useful in selecting an optimum ANF input pattern to octopus cells.

This PhD completion seminar forms part of the Biomedical Engineering Seminar Series.

All Seminar/Forums